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The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil   by Stephen Collins
On Sale Date: October 7, 2014
9781250050397, 1250050391
$20.00 USD
Hardcover
Comics & Graphic Novels / Literary
Picador
240 pages
Includes black-and-white illustrations throughout
6.2 in W | 8.8 in H | 1 in T | 1 lb Wt
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down Summary
A BOOK FOR ANYONE WHO HAS EVER HAD A BEARD (OR SEEN ONE).

The job of the skin is to keep it all in....And never let anything show.

On the island of Here, livin’s easy. Conduct is orderly. Lawns are neat. Citizens are clean shaven—and Dave is the most fastidious of them all.

Dave is bald, but for a single hair. He loves drawing, his desk job—and The Bangles. But on one fateful day, his life is upended...by an unstoppable (yet pretty impressive) beard.

An off-beat fable worthy of Roald Dahl and Tim Burton, The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil is a darkly funny meditation on life, death, and what it means to be different—and a timeless ode to the art of beard maintenance.

• Winner of the Inaugural 9th Art Award
• A Finalist for the Waterstones Book of the Year
• Written in the tradition of Roald Dahl, a “fairy tale for adults” (The Observer) that will resonate with fans of Tim Burton

down Contributor Bio(s)
STEPHEN COLLINS was born in 1980 and grew up in south London. He began cartooning in 2003, and has since won several awards, including the Jonathan Cape/Observer Graphic Short Story Prize and the inaugural 9th Art Award. His work has appeared in many publications worldwide, including Wired, GQ, and the BBC, and he contributes regular comics to the Guardian Weekend and Prospect magazine. He lives near Hertford with his wife and a well-charged beard trimmer.

down Quotes/Reviews
“An amazing book. Completely original. Surreal yet believable.”—Raymond Briggs

“It’s part satire, part parable, part nursery rhyme, and part disaster movie, and it’s an utter joy to read.”—The Times (London)


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